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dc.contributor.authorGaston, Jordan R.
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Sally A.
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, Tricia L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T12:32:54Z
dc.date.available2015-03-18T12:32:54Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-16
dc.identifier.citationGaston JR, Roberts SA, Humphreys TL (2015) Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Non-Sexually Transmitted Strains of Haemophilus ducreyi. PLoS ONE 10(3): e0118613. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0118613en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10456/37713
dc.description.abstractHaemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of chancroid, has been previously reported to show genetic variance in several key virulence factors, placing strains of the bacterium into two genetically distinct classes. Recent studies done in yaws-endemic areas of the South Pacific have shown that H. ducreyi is also a major cause of cutaneous limb ulcers (CLU) that are not sexually transmitted. To genetically assess CLU strains relative to the previously described class I, class II phylogenetic hierarchy, we examined nucleotide sequence diversity at 11 H. ducreyi loci, including virulence and housekeeping genes, which encompass approximately 1% of the H. ducreyi genome. Sequences for all 11 loci indicated that strains collected from leg ulcers exhibit DNA sequences homologous to class I strains of H. ducreyi. However, sequences for 3 loci, including a hemoglobin receptor (hgbA), serum resistance protein (dsrA), and a collagen adhesin (ncaA) contained informative amounts of variation. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that these non-sexually transmitted strains of H. ducreyi comprise a sub-clonal population within class I strains of H. ducreyi. Molecular dating suggests that CLU strains are the most recently developed, having diverged approximately 0.355 million years ago, fourteen times more recently than the class I/class II divergence. The CLU strains' divergence falls after the divergence of humans from chimpanzees, making it the first known H. ducreyi divergence event directly influenced by the selective pressures accompanying human hosts.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by Allegheny College. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0118613en_US
dc.rights© 2015 Gaston et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectHaemophilus ducreyien_US
dc.subjectphylogenyen_US
dc.titleMolecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Non-Sexually Transmitted Strains of Haemophilus ducreyien_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiochemistryen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.citation.volume10en_US
dc.citation.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0118613
dc.contributor.avlauthorHumphreys, Tricia L.


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