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dc.contributor.authorMumme, Ronald L.
dc.contributor.authorBowman, Reed
dc.contributor.authorPruett, M. Shane
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, John W.
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T19:48:22Z
dc.date.available2015-09-23T19:48:22Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-20
dc.identifier.citationMumme, Ronald L., et al. 2015. "Natal territory size, group size, and body mass affect lifetime fitness in the cooperatively breeding Florida Scrub-Jay." The Auk 132, no. 3: 634-646.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-8038
dc.identifier.issn1938-4254
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10456/38133
dc.description.abstractEarly rearing conditions can have profound short- and long-term effects on survival and reproduction of vertebrates. In cooperatively breeding birds, where variable social conditions interact with other sources of environmental variation, fitness consequences of the natal environment are of particular interest. We used data from a long-term study of the Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) to examine how characteristics of the natal brood, territory, and social group interacted to influence future survival and reproduction. Nestling and juvenile body mass were significant positive predictors of survival from fledging through the first year of life. The area of oak scrub in the natal territory correlated positively with nestling and juvenile body mass and had two long-term consequences: it was positively related to the probability of becoming a breeder and negatively related to age at first breeding, particularly for males. Effects of natal group size were complex and partially dependent on territory size. Although positively associated with nestling mass and postfledging survival, the presence of helpers was negatively related to juvenile body mass, but only in territories with,8 ha of oak scrub, suggesting that helpers become competitors for food as juveniles in small territories reach independence. Although early-life environmental conditions had strong effects on nestling and juvenile body mass, survival to yearling stage, and acquisition of a breeding territory, early conditions were not significant predictors of survival or reproduction once breeding status was obtained. This result suggests that low-quality jays from poor natal environments are winnowed out of the pool of potential breeders by intense intraspecific competition, ultimately leading to low heterogeneity in breeder quality. Our findings help to resolve the long-standing question of why Florida Scrub-Jays defend such unusually large territories for their body size, revealing a key selective advantage for cooperative territorial defense in the evolution of cooperative breeding.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Ornithologists’ Unionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAuken_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1642/AUK-14-258.1en_US
dc.subjectage at fledgingen_US
dc.subjectbrood sizeen_US
dc.subjectgroup sizeen_US
dc.subjectterritory sizeen_US
dc.subjecthelpersen_US
dc.subjectnestling body conditionen_US
dc.subjectpostfledging survivalen_US
dc.subjectsilver spoon effectsen_US
dc.titleNatal territory size, group size, and body mass affect lifetime fitness in the cooperatively breeding Florida Scrub-Jayen_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.citation.volume132en_US
dc.citation.issue3en_US
dc.citation.spage634en_US
dc.citation.epage646en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1642/AUK-14-258.1
dc.contributor.avlauthorMumme, Ronald L.


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