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dc.contributor.authorHaywood, Benjamin K.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-21T13:46:14Z
dc.date.available2016-12-21T13:46:14Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-06
dc.identifier.citationHaywood, B.K., Parrish, J.K., and Dolliver, J. (2016) Place-based and data-rich citizen science as a precursor for conservation action. Conservation Biology 30(3), 476-486. doi:10.1111/cobi.12702en_US
dc.identifier.issn0888-8892
dc.identifier.issn1523-1739
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10456/42206
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental education strategies have customarily placed substantial focus on enhancing ecological knowledge and literacy with the hope that, upon discovering relevant facts and concepts, participants will be better equipped to process and dissect environmental issues and, therefore, make more informed decisions. The assumption is that informed citizens will become active citizens––enthusiastically lobbying for, and participating in, conservation-oriented action. We surveyed and interviewed and used performance data from 432 participants in the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team (COASST), a scientifically rigorous citizen science program, to explore measurable change in and links between understanding and action. We found that participation in rigorous citizen science was associated with significant increases in participant knowledge and skills; a greater connection to place and, secondarily, to community; and an increasing awareness of the relative impact of anthropogenic activities on local ecosystems specifically through increasing scientific understanding of the ecosystem and factors affecting it. Our results suggest that a place-based, data-rich experience linked explicitly to local, regional, and global issues can lead tomeasurable change in individual and collective action, expressed in our case study principally through participation in citizen science and community action and communication of program results to personal acquaintances and elected officials. We propose the following tenets of conservation literacy based on emergent themes and the connections between them explicit in our data: place-based learning creates personal meaning making; individual experience nested within collective (i.e., program-wide) experience facilitates an understanding of the ecosystem process and function at local and regional scales; and science-based meaning making creates informed concern (i.e., the ability to discern both natural and anthropogenic forcing), which allows individuals to develop a personalized prioritization schema and engage in conservation action.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConservation Biologyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12702/fullen_US
dc.rightsThis is the peer-reviewed version of the following article: Haywood, B.K., Parrish, J.K., and Dolliver, J. (2016) Place-based and data-rich citizen science as a precursor for conservation action. Conservation Biology 30(3), 476-486. doi:10.1111/cobi.12702, which has been published in final form at https://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cobi.12702. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions."en_US
dc.subjectcoastalen_US
dc.subjectcollective actionen_US
dc.subjectexperiential learningen_US
dc.subjectinformal scienceen_US
dc.subjectmarine birdsen_US
dc.subjectsense of placeen_US
dc.titlePlace-based, data-rich citizen science as a precursor for conservation actionen_US
dc.description.versionOriginal manuscript prior to peer review (preprint)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science / Studiesen_US
dc.citation.volume30en_US
dc.citation.issue3en_US
dc.citation.spage476en_US
dc.citation.epage486en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cobi.12702
dc.contributor.avlauthorHaywood, Benjamin K.


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