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dc.contributor.authorWissinger, Scott A.
dc.contributor.authorWhiteman, Howard H.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-23T15:41:09Z
dc.date.available2017-03-23T15:41:09Z
dc.date.issued2005-01-01
dc.identifier.citationWhiteman, H.H., and Wissinger, S.A. (2005). Amphibian population cycles and long-term data sets. [In] Lannoo, M. (2005). Amphibian declines: The conservation status of United States species. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780520235922
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10456/42581
dc.description.abstractAlthough most researchers agree that many amphibian populations are declining, there is debate about how to distinguish human-induced declines from natural population fluctuations. As with many species, amphibian populations are regulated by a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that can create cyclic population fluctuations. However, when compared to organisms such as insects and small mammals, there is a dearth of basic ecological information about the factors that underlie amphibian population cycles. This chapter argues that systematic, long-term research on amphibian populations is necessary to provide basic information about the amplitude and frequency of natural fluctuations. Such baseline information is essential for posing and testing alternative hypotheses to explain amphibian population declines. The chapter reviews twenty years of research on a population of Arizona tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum nebulosum) at the Mexican Cut Nature Preserve in south-central Colorado. It also discusses the ability of long-term demographic studies to provide the background information necessary to distinguish natural fluctuations from human-induced declines.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Of California Pressen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1525/california/9780520235922.003.0025en_US
dc.rightsThis article is restricted by copyright. Please contact the author or publisher for access.en_US
dc.subjectAmphibian declinesen_US
dc.subjectArizona Tiger Salamandersen_US
dc.subjectAmbystoma tigrinum nebulosumen_US
dc.subjectMexican Cut Nature Preserveen_US
dc.subjectamphibiansen_US
dc.subjectpopulation declinesen_US
dc.subjectpopulation cyclesen_US
dc.subjectpopulation fluctuationsen_US
dc.titleAmphibian Populations Cycles and Long-Term Data Setsen_US
dc.title.alternateTwenty Fiveen_US
dc.title.alternateAmphibian Declines:The Conservation Status of United States Speciesen_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.citation.spage177en_US
dc.citation.epage184en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1525/california/9780520235922.001.0001
dc.contributor.avlauthorWissinger, Scott A.


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