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dc.contributor.authorWang, Jun-Jian
dc.contributor.authorPisani, Oliva
dc.contributor.authorLin, Lisa H.
dc.contributor.authorLun, Olivia O. Y.
dc.contributor.authorBowden, Richard D.
dc.contributor.authorLajtha, Kate
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, André J.
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Myrna J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-09T14:04:17Z
dc.date.available2018-03-09T14:04:17Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-27
dc.identifier.citationWang, J.J., Pisani, O., Lin, L.H., et al. (2017). Long-term litter manipulation alters soil organic matter turnover in a temperate deciduous forest. Science of the Total Environment, 607-608: 865-875. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.063en_US
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697
dc.identifier.issne1879-1026
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10456/45844
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding soil organic matter (OM) biogeochemistry at the molecular-level is essential for assessing potential impacts from management practices and climate change on shifts in soil carbon storage. Biomarker analyses and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used in an ongoing detrital input and removal treatment experiment in a temperate deciduous forest in Pennsylvania, USA, to examine how above- and belowground plant inputs control soil OM quantity and quality at the molecular-level. From plant material to surface soils, the free acyclic lipids and cutin, suberin, and lignin biomarkers were preferentially retained over free sugars and free cyclic lipids. After 20 years of above-ground litter addition (Double Litter) or exclusion (No Litter) treatments, soil OM composition was relatively more degraded, as revealed by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. Under Doubled Litter inputs, soil carbon and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) concentrations were unchanged, suggesting that the current OM degradation status is a reflection of microbial-mediated degradation that occurred prior to the 20-year sampling campaign. Soil OM degradation was higher in the No Litter treatments, likely due to the decline in fresh, above-ground litter inputs over time. Furthermore, root and root and litter exclusion treatments (No Roots and No Inputs, respectively) both significantly reduced free sugars and PLFAs and increased preservation of suberin-derived compounds. PLFA stress ratios and the low N-acetyl resonances from diffusion edited 1H NMR also indicate substrate limitations and reduced microbial biomass with these treatments. Overall, we highlight that storage of soil carbon and its biochemical composition do not linearly increase with plant inputs because the microbial processing of soil OM is also likely altered in the studied forest.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.ispartofScience of the Total Environmenten_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.063en_US
dc.subjectdetrital input and removal treatmenten_US
dc.subjectCarbohydratesen_US
dc.subjectlipidsen_US
dc.subjectCutinen_US
dc.subjectsuberinen_US
dc.subjectligninen_US
dc.titleLong-term litter manipulation alters soil organic matter turnover in a temperate deciduous foresten_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science / Studiesen_US
dc.citation.volume607-608en_US
dc.citation.spage865en_US
dc.citation.epage875en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.063
dc.contributor.avlauthorBowden, Richard D.


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