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dc.contributor.authorBinnington, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-09T20:41:19Z
dc.date.available2018-03-09T20:41:19Z
dc.date.issued2009-06-26
dc.identifier.citationBinnington, I. (2009). Standing Upon a Volcano: Cincinnati’s Newspapers Debate Emancipation, 1860–1862. American Nineteenth Century History, 10(2): 163-186. doi: 10.1080/14664650902908128en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10456/45850
dc.description.abstractNewspaper editors in Cincinnati saw the abolition question on a spectrum before President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in September 1862. Most favored some form of confiscation of Confederate slaves for use in the Union war effort; some favored emancipation of slaves as a means to weaken the Confederacy; but almost all vociferously opposed any idea that unrestrained black freedom might be an outcome of the Civil War. While it appears to historians that there was an “inexorable logic” in the development of Union war aims, it is clear from the point of view of Cincinnati that the inexorability of that logic was heavily contested.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Nineteenth Century Historyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1080/14664650902908128en_US
dc.rightsThis article was selected and published in American Nineteenth Century History ©2009 Binnington. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectemancipationen_US
dc.subjectcivil waren_US
dc.subjectCincinnatien_US
dc.subjectnewspapersen_US
dc.subjectconfiscationen_US
dc.titleStanding Upon a Volcano: Cincinnati’s Newspapers Debate Emancipation, 1860–1862en_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.citation.volume10en_US
dc.citation.issue2en_US
dc.citation.spage163en_US
dc.citation.epage186en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14664650902908128
dc.contributor.avlauthorBinnington, Ian


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