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dc.contributor.authorGross-Camp, Nicole D.
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez, Iokiñe
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorInturias, Mirna
dc.contributor.authorMassao, Glory
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-03T18:55:42Z
dc.date.available2019-06-03T18:55:42Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-19
dc.identifier.citationGross-Camp, N.; Rodriguez, I.; Martin, A.; Inturias, M.; Massao, G. The Type of Land We Want: Exploring the Limits of Community Forestry in Tanzania and Bolivia. Sustainability 2019, 11, 1643.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2071-1050
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10456/48743
dc.description.abstractWe explore local people’s perspectives of community forest (CF) on their land in Tanzania and Bolivia. Community forest management is known to improve ecological conditions of forests, but is more variable in its social outcomes. Understanding communities’ experience of community forestry and the potential benefits and burdens its formation may place on a community will likely help in predicting its sustainability as a forest and land management model. Six villages, two in Tanzania and four in Bolivia, were selected based on the presence of community forestry in varying stages. We found that communities were generally supportive of existing community forests but cautious of their expansion. Deeper explorations of this response using ethnographic research methods reveal that an increase in community forest area is associated with increasing opportunity costs and constraints on agricultural land use, but not an increase in benefits. Furthermore, community forests give rise to a series of intra- and inter-community conflicts, often pertaining to the financial benefits stemming from the forests (distribution issues), perceived unfairness and weakness in decision–making processes (procedure/participation), and also tensions over cultural identity issues (recognition). Our findings suggest that communities’ willingness to accept community forests requires a broader consideration of the multifunctional landscape in which it is embedded, as well as an engagement with the justice tensions such an intervention inevitably creates.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by ESRC Research Grant No. ES/K005812/1 Conservation, Markets and Justice.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSustainabilityen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/11/6/1643en_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).en_US
dc.subjectagricultural expansionen_US
dc.subjectdecentralized natural resource managementen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental justiceen_US
dc.subjectindigenousen_US
dc.subjectmultifunctional landscapeen_US
dc.titleThe Type of Land We Want: Exploring the Limits of Community Forestry in Tanzania and Boliviaen_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science / Studiesen_US
dc.citation.volume11en_US
dc.citation.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su11061643
dc.contributor.avlauthorGross-Camp, Nicole D.


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