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dc.contributor.authorAnnibale, Fabiane Santana
dc.contributor.authorde Sousa, Verônica Thiemi Tsutae
dc.contributor.authorde Sousa, Carlos Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorVenesky, Matthew D.
dc.contributor.authorRossa-Feres, Denise de Cerqueira
dc.contributor.authorWassersug, Richard J.
dc.contributor.authorNomura, Fausto
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-25T15:42:30Z
dc.date.available2020-09-25T15:42:30Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-15
dc.identifier.citationAnnibale, F.S., de Sousa, V.T.T., de Sousa, C.E. et al. Smooth, striated, or rough: how substrate textures affect the feeding performance of tadpoles with different oral morphologies. Zoomorphology 139, 97–110 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00435-019-00469-xen_US
dc.identifier.issn0720-213X
dc.identifier.issn1432-234X
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.allegheny.edu/handle/10456/50997
dc.description.abstractFor grazing animals that share spatial and alimentary resources, the relationship between differences in oral morphology and the physical properties of substrates can help explain how and where species forage. The substrates may require different efforts from animals to access and remove food from their surfaces. Variation in oral morphology may produce differences in animals’ feeding efficiency. We tested whether one substrate characteristic, the surface texture (i.e., smooth, striated and rough), influences the growth and food consumption rates of anuran larvae from nine species with different oral morphologies. Tadpoles with few keratinized oral structures and those with more gaps in the marginal papillae row were more efficient grazing on smooth and rough surfaces, respectively. This may indicate possible feeding specializations. Conversely, tadpoles with a high number of labial tooth rows, regardless of the number of gaps in these structures, and those with only a dorsal gap in the marginal papillae row were equally efficient feeding upon all substrate textures. Tadpoles with the generalized labial tooth row formula 2(2)/3(1), had higher growth rates than the other species, suggesting an adaptive significance for this common oral morphology. We demonstrated that species differ in feeding efficiency when grazing on substrates with different textures. This can help elucidate the adaptive significance of variation in tadpole oral morphology. We also provide insights on resource selection and niche partitioning among species, especially for those whose diets do not differ in quantity or quality, as it is common in anuran larval assemblages.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (1562647 to F.S. Annibale), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) (302328/2017-3 to D.C. Rossa-Feres., Universal Grant—420051/2016-3 to F. Nomura.), and the joint CNPq/FAPESP (Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) project (SISBIOTA 563075/2010-4 and 2010/52321-7) on Brazilian anuran larvae biology to D.C. Rossa-Feres and F. Nomura.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_US
dc.relation.ispartofZoomorphologyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00435-019-00469-xen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NCen_US
dc.titleSmooth, striated, or rough: how substrate textures affect the feeding performance of tadpoles with different oral morphologiesen_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.citation.volume139en_US
dc.citation.spage97en_US
dc.citation.epage110en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00435-019-00469-x
dc.contributor.avlauthorVenesky, Matthew D.


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