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dc.contributor.authorWang, Jun-Jian
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yina
dc.contributor.authorBowden, Richard D.
dc.contributor.authorLajtha, Kate
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, André J.
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Wan-Ling
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Myrna J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-23T13:50:21Z
dc.date.available2020-10-23T13:50:21Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-23
dc.identifier.citationWang, J., Liu, Y., Bowden, R. D., Lajtha, K., Simpson, A. J., Huang, W., & Simpson, M. J. (2020). Long-term nitrogen addition alters the composition of soil-derived dissolved organic matter. ACS Earth and Space Chemistry, 4(2), 189-201. doi:10.1021/acsearthspacechem.9b00262en_US
dc.identifier.issn2472-3452
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.allegheny.edu/handle/10456/51218
dc.description.abstractForest soil dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a major source of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that is an important component of biogeochemical cycles. While many studies have shown that DOM dynamics are regulated strongly by nitrogen availability, how continued or increasing deposition of reactive nitrogen to forests alters the molecular composition of soil DOM remains unexplored. We studied the storage and molecular-level composition of soil-derived DOM after 22 years of nitrogen addition in a temperate deciduous forest. Soil DOC quantity changes were small (+19.0 g/m2; ∼10% increase) but the molecular composition changed markedly. Indices based on optical spectroscopy suggested that DOM molecular size and aromaticity were elevated with nitrogen addition. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses showed that DOM contained more carbohydrates and aromatics but less aliphatic compounds with nitrogen addition. Ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometric analysis further supports the finding that solid-phase isolated DOM from nitrogen-added soils was larger in molecular size and aromaticity. Condensed aromatic dissolved black carbon, particularly those compounds with high molecular size/carbon number and those stored in deep soils, showed the greatest percent increase with nitrogen addition. These results countered our hypothesis that soluble carbohydrates would be selectively removed from the DOC pool compared to polyphenols and condensed aromatic components under nitrogen enrichment. These changes in DOM molecular composition may also impact microbial communities and downstream metabolism of DOC.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada via a Discovery Grant (#2015-05760) and a Discovery Accelerator Supplement (#478038-15) to M.J.S. The authors thank the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for FT-ICR MS access (Proposal #49736) and additional funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC #41807360). The authors sincerely thank Lori vandenEnden, Zhangliu Du, Sam Reese, Ivy Ryan, and Allegheny College for the field, laboratory, and financial assistance.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherACS Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofACS Earth and Space Chemistryen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsearthspacechem.9b00262en_US
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0en_US
dc.subjectSoilsen_US
dc.subjectCarbohydratesen_US
dc.subjectSoil pollutionen_US
dc.subjectDissolved organic matteren_US
dc.subjectAromatic compoundsen_US
dc.titleLong-Term Nitrogen Addition Alters the Composition of Soil-Derived Dissolved Organic Matteren_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science / Studiesen_US
dc.description.embargoThis version of the article is available for viewing to the public after December 23, 2020.en_US
dc.citation.volume4en_US
dc.citation.issue2en_US
dc.citation.spage189en_US
dc.citation.epage201en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acsearthspacechem.9b00262
dc.contributor.avlauthorBowden, Richard D.


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