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dc.contributor.authorBender, Kathryn E.
dc.contributor.authorBadiger, Aishwarya
dc.contributor.authorRoe, Brian E.
dc.contributor.authorShu, Yiheng
dc.contributor.authorQi, Danyi
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-16T20:33:35Z
dc.date.available2022-09-16T20:33:35Z
dc.date.issued2022-08
dc.identifier.citationBender, Kathryn E., Aishwarya Badiger, Brian E. Roe, Yiheng Shu, and Danyi Qi. "Consumer Behavior during the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Analysis of Food Purchasing and Management Behaviors in U.S. Households through the Lens of Food System Resilience." Socio-Economic Planning Sciences 82, (2022): 101107. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.seps.2021.101107. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038012121000999.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0038-0121
dc.identifier.issn1873-6041
dc.identifier.other101107.0
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.allegheny.edu/handle/10456/55378
dc.description.abstractThe COVID-19 pandemic has stimulated considerable interest in the resilience of the U.S. food system. Less attention has been paid to the resiliency characteristics of the final link in the food system - individual households. We use national survey data from July 2020 to understand the food acquisition, preparation, and management strategies that households implemented in response to the pandemic. We find a substantial increase in the amount of food prepared and consumed at home which scales with respondents' time availability, perceived risks of dining out, and pandemic-induced income disruption. We then identify several household responses to support this increase in home food consumption that are in line with practices suggested to enhance resiliency at other links in the food supply chain, including increased cold storage capacity and enhanced in-house capability via improved cooking and food management skills. We discuss how responses such as improved food skills can reduce the propagation of shocks through the supply chain by allowing greater flexibility and less waste, while actions such as increased home cold storage capacity could undermine system resilience by exacerbating bull-whip effects, i.e., amplifying consumer demand shocks that are propagated to upstream food supply chain actors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOhio Agricultural Research and Development Center; Louisiana Board of Regentsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocio-Economic Planning Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seps.2021.101107en_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by- nc-nd/4.0/).en_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19 pandemicen_US
dc.subjectFood managementen_US
dc.subjectHouseholden_US
dc.subjectFood wasteen_US
dc.subjectResilienceen_US
dc.subjectCold storageen_US
dc.titleConsumer behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic: An analysis of food purchasing and management behaviors in U.S. households through the lens of food system resilienceen_US
dc.description.versionPublished articleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness and Economicsen_US
dc.citation.volume82, pt Aen_US
dc.citation.issue101107en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seps.2021.101107
dc.contributor.avlauthorBender, Kathryn E.


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