Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHarrod, William D.
dc.contributor.authorMumme, Ronald L.
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-22T18:16:33Z
dc.date.available2022-11-22T18:16:33Z
dc.date.issued2021-01
dc.identifier.citationHarrod, W.D. and Mumme, R.L. (2021), Females compensate for moult-associated male nest desertion in Hooded Warblers. Ibis, 163: 159-170. https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12850en_US
dc.identifier.issn0019-1019
dc.identifier.issn1474-919X
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.allegheny.edu/handle/10456/55918
dc.description.abstractUniparental offspring desertion occurs in a wide variety of avian taxa and usually reflects sexual conflict over parental care. In many species, desertion yields immediate reproductive benefits for deserters if they can re-mate and breed again during the same nesting season; in such cases desertion may be selectively advantageous even if it significantly reduces the fitness of the current brood. However, in many other species, parents desert late-season offspring when opportunities to re-nest are absent. In these cases, any reproductive benefits of desertion are delayed, and desertion is unlikely to be advantageous unless the deserted parent can compensate for the loss of its partner and minimize costs to the current brood. We tested this parental compensation hypothesis in Hooded Warblers Setophaga citrina, a species in which males regularly desert late-season nestlings and fledglings during moult. Females from deserted nests effectively doubled their provisioning efforts, and nestlings from deserted nests received just as much food, gained mass at the same rate, and were no more likely to die from either complete nest predation or brood reduction as young from biparental nests. The female provisioning response, however, was significantly related to nestling age; females undercompensated for male desertion when the nestlings were young, but overcompensated as nestlings approached fledging age, probably because of time constraints that brooding imposed on females with young nestlings. Overall, our results indicate that female Hooded Warblers completely compensate for male moult-associated nest desertion, and that deserting males pay no reproductive cost for desertion, at least up to the point of fledging. Along with other studies, our findings support the general conclusion that late-season offspring desertion is likely to evolve only when parental compensation by the deserted partner can minimize costs to the current brood.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofIBISen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12850en_US
dc.rights© 2020 British Ornithologists' Unionen_US
dc.subjectNestling growthen_US
dc.subjectNestling provisioningen_US
dc.subjectNestling survivalen_US
dc.subjectParental careen_US
dc.subjectParental overcompensationen_US
dc.subjectSetophaga citrinaen_US
dc.titleFemales compensate for moult-associated male nest desertion in Hooded Warblersen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.citation.volume163en_US
dc.citation.issue1en_US
dc.citation.spage159en_US
dc.citation.epage170en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ibi.12850
dc.contributor.avlauthorMumme, Ronald L.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record