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dc.contributor.authorKirk, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorHazlett, Megan A.
dc.contributor.authorShaffer, Chris L.
dc.contributor.authorWissinger, Scott A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-22T19:08:08Z
dc.date.available2022-11-22T19:08:08Z
dc.date.issued2022-07
dc.identifier.citationKirk, M. A., Hazlett, M. A., Shaffer, C. L., & Wissinger, S. A. (2022). Forested watersheds mitigate the thermal degradation of headwater fish assemblages under future climate change. Ecology of Freshwater Fish, 31, 559– 570. https://doi.org/10.1111/eff.12650en_US
dc.identifier.issn0906-6691
dc.identifier.issn1600-0633
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.allegheny.edu/handle/10456/55922
dc.description.abstractCertain habitat features of stream ecosystems can reduce their sensitivity to climate change and help protect the integrity of cold-water aquatic resources. Identifying such features is imperative for conserving the climate refugia of cold-water species. Using a combination of stream temperature and fish assemblage data, we quantified thermal sensitivities of 192 headwater streams in Northwest Pennsylvania to identify which landscape features best explained stream susceptibility to temperature change. We then projected changes in native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) distributions, non-native brown trout (Salmo trutta) distributions and declines in cold-water thermal integrity under future climate warming and land use change scenarios. Brook trout were predicted to become increasingly relegated to smaller streams under future stream warming. However, we found that streams with intact forest cover at the watershed level had low thermal sensitivities, which slowed rates of projected warming. As a result, streams with forested watersheds were predicted to have smaller declines in thermal integrity and lower extirpation probabilities of brook trout. Additionally, non-native brown trout were not predicted to expand distributions under projected warming, suggesting minimal synergistic effects between non-native species and climate change. Forest cover buffers headwater streams from the effects of global change, similar to how groundwater inputs reduce the rate of stream warming. Forest restoration at riparian and watershed levels should help mitigate thermal-induced degradation of cold-water aquatic resources.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEcology of Freshwater Fishen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eff.12650en_US
dc.rights© 2021 John Wiley & Sons A/S.en_US
dc.subjectClimate refugiaen_US
dc.subjectCold-water speciesen_US
dc.subjectSpecies distribution modelsen_US
dc.subjectStream temperaturesen_US
dc.subjectThermal habitatsen_US
dc.subjectWarmingen_US
dc.titleForested watersheds mitigate the thermal degradation of headwater fish assemblages under future climate changeen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science / Studiesen_US
dc.citation.volume31en_US
dc.citation.issue3en_US
dc.citation.spage559en_US
dc.citation.epage570en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eff.12650
dc.contributor.avlauthorShaffer, Chris L.
dc.contributor.avlauthorWissinger, Scott A.


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